Thursday, December 18, 2008

Parent and Child Relations

Parent and child relationships are a large focus of the play Romeo and Juliet. In a well developed paragraph describe what Shakespeare is trying to convey about parenrs and children to the reader through the characters of Lord and Lady Capulet, and the events in Act III?
  1. Avoid Personal Pronouns- I, My, We, Our, Us, etc
  2. Use ONE piece of TEXTUAL EVIDENCE with MLA format "(III.iii.3-8.).
  3. First sentence defines parent/child relationships, or relationships, or the topic that is the center of your perspective.
  4. Compare the topic to the events in the play.
  5. The insight that Shakespeare is providing is the topic that guides the argument. Therefore, you should make sure to FULLY DEVELOP the TOPIC.
  6. Answer the question.

25 comments:

Marc said...

Parent child relationships are the driving force of how the child will be as they grow up and start to develop their personality. This is why Juliet is in search of the love she never had and how she has such a tough character.
Romeo & Juliet has this same perspective because Juliet was neglected by her parents and has an awful relationship with them. This has built Juliet into the though women she is. She does not cry like a baby and does not take order easily. Her neglected relationship has had having her to grow up alone and figure things out by herself. "To, go with Paris to Saint Peter's Church, or I will drag thee on a hurdle thither. Out, you green-sickness carrion! Out, you Baggage!"(III.iv.154-158). Even after Capulet said such hurtful words Juliet did not agree to marry Paris. She was strong and wanted to keep herself to Romeo even to the furthest extent. Juliet has even fallen in love for the sole fact that she has received minimal love form her parents. She needed someone who actually cares about her, she needs someone to love. In a hypothetical way the whole tragedy of Romeo and Juliet could have turned out differently if only Juliet had had a better relationship with her parents. All in all parent child relationships are the sculpture of an adolescent for the good or the worst.

gracie said...

Parent child relationships are made up of arguments and resolutions. How a family treats one another; the respect demonstrated from person to person, the kinds of rights and wrongs a child is taught, shapes the person the child becomes. Shakespeare is right on in his description of parent child relationships through the characters of Lord and Lady Capulet and their daughter Juliet. Parent child relationships often appear different on the outside than they are in reality. At first glace Juliet could look perfectly content standing next to her mother. If you got closer maybe you would notice the tension, the cool attitude. This in contrast with the warm atmosphere you would feel around Juliet and the Nurse is very apparent. Juliet's mother never paid much attention to her daughter and did not take her opinions and ideas seriously. Parents often don't find the suggestions teenagers make to be important. Both parents and their children don't always think of their family members and what's best for them, but what they themselves want. "I think she will be ruled in all respects by me--nay, more, i doubt it not."(III.iii.14-15.). When Lord Capulet says this to Paris he does not say it because he knows Juliet loves him. He says it merely because he thinks Paris is a good man and therefor decides he has the right to tell his daughter who to marry.

Siddharth said...

The author would first like to point out that Marc von Tersch is once again the first one to post his response...

In an ideal world, a blistering utopia, parents and children are one and the same, the only difference being the former are more adept players in the game of life. Building on the concept of a parent-child friendship rather than a dictatorship, William Shakespeare effectively displays in his Romeo & Juliet the way in which parents and children should not react to each other. By using a powerful example of the consequences of an enforced despotism, it is clearly revealed to the reader how not to conduct a parent-child relationship. Between Juliet and her mother, Shakespeare shows how severely lacking Juliet is of motherly guidance and attention, making her a solitary and partially uninfluenced figure. As the relationship is tense due to its official and self-important demeanor, Juliet does not really get to spend time with a mother, but rather a woman whose will is to impose and nothing more. The same case is present between her and her father when he replies after she denies his match, " How, will she none? Doth she not give us thanks? Is she not proud? Doth she not count her blessed,
Unworthy as she is, that we have wrought So worthy a gentleman to be her bride (III.v.142-6)?" Finally, the separated relationship between Juliet and her father is also profoundly important, as Shakespeare at last strengthens his point of parental power mongering. Ultimately, Shakespeare is trying to convey that children and their parents are meant to be equals, both people with different experiences to share and stories to tell. The parent just has more than the kid.

DJ said...

The parent-child relationship is the first real relationship a person has. They are around their parents for most of their early life and learn from their parents and that relationship. The relationship is not always perfect and changes as the child grows up and develops his/her own identity and relationships. The child will always have their relationship with their parents, even if they themselves are not children and it is the foundation for the rest of their life. The teenage years put the most strain on the parent-child relationship, with hormones going all over the place, trying to understand the real world, and just very emotional in general. This just happens to be the age of Juliet and it is apparent that she does not have healthy relationship with her parents. This is not to say that there is no love at all, but there is quite large gap to be filled, and that is by the Nurse. Juliet's mother, Lady Capulet only shows a true interest in Juliet when she is of proper age of marriage, at least in Elizabethan times. Juliet is rebellious and not held down by a strong parent-child relationship, so is very uneager to marry Paris, her mother's chosen suitor. It would appear that Lord Capulet shows a little more care for Juliet, at least in Act I, for when talking to Paris about a possible marriage he says only if Juliet agrees. Then in Act III however, Lord Capulet has a completely different mindset and arranges the marriage behind Juliet's back. Juliet's parent-child relationship is very clearly strained as early as Act I, for this quote proves it; "I'll look to like, if looking liking move. / But no more deep will I endart mine eye / Than your consent gives strength to make it fly (I.iii.98-100)." This quote is Juliet rebelliously telling her mother that yes, she will look at Paris, but will not like him anymore, husband or otherwise. Would Juliet have been more willing to listen to her mother of they had had a good parent-child relationship? Perhaps, but nevertheless the outcome of the whole story might have changed drastically if Juliet had had a loving parent-child relationship. Shakespeare was trying to say that to have a good start in life, you need to have a good relationship at home, for it will shape the rest of your life, whether you are social or not, nice or not, or happy or not.

Will Sullivan said...

In a parent, a child needs somebody to love and care for them; a person they can lean on when they need help.Shakespeare displays his idea of what a parent-child relationship should be like by using a foil- Lord and Lady Capulet, the parents of Juliet. Lord and Lady Capulet do not really know Juliet. Her troubled relationship with Romeo is unknown to them, and they make no attempt whatsoever at figuring out what is going on in the chaotic love affair of Juliet. The result of this neglect is ultimately death for their only remaining child. Through this, Shakespeare portrays his idea of parents needing to talk with their teenagers, and to see if they have any questions. Shakespeare felt like tragedies involving teenagers such as the one that takes place in the play can be avoided if parents were more emotionally attached to their children. The reader gets an idea of how unattached the Capulets are from their daughter when they arrange her marriage to Paris. Lady Capulet breaks the "wonderful" news to her, saying "Marry, my child, early next Thursday, morn, the gallant, young, and noble gentleman, the County Paris, at St. Peter's Church shall happily make thee there a noble bride (III.v.113-6)". If Lady Capulet knew her daughter better, she would certainly have never arranged the marriage, knowing that Paris was not the man for Juliet, and knowing that Juliet had plans that would conflict with a matrimonial agreement with Paris. Shakespeare is trying to stress that a perhaps the most precious item a parent can possess is their child, and it won't last forever.

Winson said...

Parent and child relationships are either strong understandings between the two or awful complication and confusion. Lord and Lady Capulet have shown little love throughout the play "Romeo and Juliet". Shakespeare has left many hints to allow the reader to question whether or not Juliet's parents love/care about her. Her mother doesn't care for her and wants her to get married. Lady Capulet does not care about Juliet's feelings and wants her to marry Paris, a rich man who has connections to royalty. However this can be viewed in to separate ways. Lady Capulet could want Juliet to have a wonderful life by having access to excessive wealth or she could just want Juliet out of the house. Either way she still doesnt care for Juliet's feelings and failed to be a mother. Instead of having raise Juliet on her own, Lady Capulet had hired the Nurse to be her caretaker. In doing this Juliet has strung together a strong lasting bond with the Nurse and abandoned all feelings that she had for her biological mother. Juliet's father on the other hand cares for Juliet in some manner. When Paris asked to marry Juliet through her father without her consent her strongly opposed and told him that he had to get her okay. "And too soon marred are those so early made. Earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she. She's the hopeful lady of my earth. But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart. My will to her consent is but a part. An she agreed within her scope of choice, Lies my consent and fair according voice. This night I hold an old accustomed feast, Whereto I have invited many a guest Such as I love. And you among the store, One more, most welcome, makes my number more. At my poor house look to behold this night Earth-treading stars that make dark heaven light (I.ii.13-37)." She is later forced to marry Paris but only because her father wished for her to get over her deceased cousin, Tybalt. This shows the understanding and misunderstandings between Lord Capulet and Juliet. However Juliet doesn't tell of her social life and what is happening between her and Romeo. Which shows how Shakespeare describes the relationship between parent and child.

Matt said...

Parent-child relationships are extremely important in the early development stages of the child's mind. The child initially is inclined to follow the parent's beliefs. This early relationship creates trust in the parent/child, and confidence to ask the other for advice, particularly the child asking the parent for advice. This is scene through Lord and Lady Capulet's relationship with Juliet. Juliet didn't feel she could trust her parents with the knowledge of her love for Romeo, so they tried to marry her off to Paris. As a result, she wound up in quite a feud with her parents, and attempting to run away. If she had established a greater trust in her parents, the events surely would have turned out differently, and they all could have lived happily together in Verona. "Hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch! I tell thee what. Get thee to church o' Thursday Or never after look me in the face. (III.v.161-3). Lord Capulet is very mad at Juliet because she refuses to marry Paris, but he doesn't know she is already married to Romeo. Reliable parent-child relationships are very important in life.

philip said...

As you grow up, there are many factors that can influence your identity. One of the greatest are your parents. If you don’t have a good relationship with them, then you are very unlikely to be like your parents. This is demonstrated by Juliet and her mother. Juliet has a rebellious attitude and is an independent woman. Her mother is obedient and depends on her husband. Lady Capulet neglects Juliet so naturally, Juliet isn’t like her. In fact, Juliet’s nurse is more like a mother to her. It is disappointing that Lady Capulet shares same view as her husband, that Juliet is an object of marriage to keep their family safe. No wonder Juliet was desperate for love when she met Romeo. However, really deep inside, Lady Capulet does love Juliet. “Oh me, oh me! My child, my only life,
Revive, look up, or I will die with thee (III.v.19-20).” Juliet may not have felt this affection from her mother, but it has always been there. We are shaped by our experiences, so if Lady Capulet never expressed her love, then Juliet would have never changed about it.

Kelsey said...

To parents of Elizabethan times, a child is seen as a way to continue the family name, as well as build stronger alliances with other families of equal social standings. Through Shakespeare’s, “Romeo and Juliet”, both parents and children’s supposed roles are well portrayed. Lady Capulet, for example, feels that Juliet is old enough, though only thirteen, to marry. Her yearning for Juliet to leave the home and bare children to a man she barely knows, is shown by the manipulation used towards Juliet when this topic is spoken of. “Younger than you- here in Verona, ladies of esteem, are made already mothers (I.iii.70).” Not only does Juliet’s mother feel this way, but her father, Lord Capulet, as well. Lord Capulet fears that his daughter will be “marred” if she is to give birth at such a feeble age, yet agrees to the marriage between Paris and Juliet quite quickly. Juliet is the last of the Capulet line, for she is the only child of Lord and Lady Capulet, there for being their only hope of continuation, and thus the quick acceptance of a dangerous marriage. Throughout “Romeo and Juliet”, Shakespeare shows quite well the distinct need of a continuing family line that Elizabethan parents had.

Stephanie said...

Shakespeare conveys the relationship between a parent and a child as strained and not loving. Both Romeo and Juliet have little to do with there parents and both love somebody and trust somebody in place of their parents, for Juliet its' her Nurse, for Romeo its Friar Lawrence. The way a child is raised drastically effects they way they act when they grow up. Not being loved by his parents made Romeo a very weak character that relied on lust instead of love. Not being loved by her parents made Juliet a very strong character that made her own decisions and was a little bit rebellious. When Romeo and Juliet instantly fall in "love" they think it is love because they have never experienced that emotion in their families. When Juliet's parents tell her she is going to marry Paris she refuses. Even when they both yell insults at her and threaten to throw her out onto the streets"Out, you green sickness, carrion! Out, you baggage!You tallow face (III.v.155-157)!"she still refuses. The story of Romeo and Juliet would greatly change based upon the way they were raised.

simone said...

A relationship is a connection between people, or objects, in an emotional way or manner. Parent child relationships are a branch off this main relationship idea. Parent child relationships are ones that should be filled with love and the act of caring. In "Romeo and Juliet, written by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare shows the outcome of children's actions when a parent child relationship lacks the act of caring and most importantly love. "To, go with Paris to Saint Peter’s church, or I will drag thee on a hurdle thither. Out, you green- sickness carrion! Out, you Baggage! (III.iv.154-58)" were the lines screamed by Juliet's anger driven father. Lord Capulet threatened to disown his own daughter but Juliet still refused to marry Paris, Juliet wouldn't love someone else to savor the love of her own father. If Juliet's relationship with her father were a loving one then she would have married Paris so save it. Also Lord Capulet wouldn't have threatened her in such a harsh manner. Shakespeare demonstrates fierce outcomes a relationship between a parental figure and child that does not consume love, such as the relationship between Juliet and her father.

Sam said...

Parent child relationships can be quite stable, but when devoid of love they can be very strenuous. This relationship is always a little awkward or in some situations completely broken when the child hits puberty or the teenage year. Juliet is a perfect example of this, her parents have been completely detached from her life and have kept her cooped up in their house with a nanny. It is glaringly obvious that she would want to fly the coop and run away with Romeo. But what Shakespeare seems to be proving or conveying through the Capulets' is that if parents are not involved in their children's lives they can't expect to get involved in said life without giving anything back n return. The parent child relationship is that you can't get something from them without giving something in return. In this regard the less the parent gets involved in the child's life the more strenuous the relationship becomes. The relationship between Juliet and her parents is so thin there is virtually no love existing between them. Lord and Lady Capulet know so little about their daughter that when Juliet seems upset by Paris's marriage proposal Capulet explodes saying "How, how! How, how! Chop-logic! what is this? 'proud', and 'I thank you' and 'I thank you not', and yet 'not proud.' Mistress minions, you thank me no thankings, nor proud me no prouds(III.v.150-154)" Coming from a man and a father who has given no reason for his own daughter to love or respect him, does not carry much weight. The fact that Capulet thinks that Juliet cares for his approval is even sadder. He knows not that Juliet has never cared for anything of his as he has never cared for anything of hers, is the true sign of a broken home. It becomes quite evident that like in Shakespeare's own life Juliet is very distant from her parents, just as Shakespeare's family is distant from his at the time. Although Juliet is emotionally distant while Shakespeare is literally, distant. In a roundabout way Shakespeare is just trying to tell parents and children to try to get to understand one another just a little better and to try to get into the others life, if just a bit. Because it is obvious that he is trying to prove that a loveless relationship is a dead relationship, and if a dead relationship is continued it can only hurt all of the parties involved.

Erica said...

Everyone knows the parent-child relationship is unavoidable; it starts from the moment a child is born. The parent-child relationship is a tough one. Neither the parent nor the child understands the other and they each think they have the best in mind for the other. The relationship is stretched to its limits but in the end it all works out. Through Lord and Lady Capulet Shakespeare is trying to say that the parents always think they know what's best and don't listen to the child's point of view because they think they know more. "Hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch! I tell thee what. Get thee to church o' Thursday, Or never after look me in the face. Speak not. Reply not. Do not answer me. (III.v.160-163)." Lord Capulet clearly expresses that he does not care what Juliet thinks, he thinks he knows what's best and has any interest another opinion. The parent-child relationship is also full of arguments and lying to make the other feel that they’re right. Juliet tells her parents that she will do what they say in order to make them feel in control. But what they don’t know is that Juliet is doing what she wants behind they’re back. Through Juliet and Lord and Lady Capulet’s actions Shakespeare clearly expresses that parent and children don’t understand each other and have no intention of trying to understand the other.

EC

Hannah said...

A relationship is a connection a person has to another person or thing. The most important relationship is between parent and child. It is the first real relationship a child will have and it shapes the way the child grows up and treats other relationships in their future. In "Romeo and Juliet," Juliet's relationship between herself and her parents, Capulet and Lady Capulet, is not strong nor do they have any control of Juliet. "Hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch! I tell thee what. Get thee to church o' Thursday Or never after look me in the face (III.v.161-3)." Capulet tells his daughter that she must marry Paris or else he will never speak to Juliet again. This relationship is not strong. Capulet does not care for Juliet, the only way for her to do what he wants is to threaten her. Juliet's relationship with her parents is weak while she is very close to the Nurse who is more like a mother figure to Juliet rather than her own mother. When Juliet meets Romeo she is immedietly in love with him because she is attracted to him and she does not know the difference between true love and attraction (lust). Her Future relationships will never be very strong because she does not know what a strong relationship is due to the very bad relationship between herself and her parents. Shakespeare was trying to show that people are influenced by the relationships they have, and the strongest relationship should be between a parent and a child.

Lauren said...

Parent and child relationships are possibly the most complex, and yet the simplest relationships there are. When Shakespeare writes about the relationship between Juliet and her parents, the understanding is clear. Lord and Lady Capulet call Juliet a daughter, but that is all. She is not treated like a beloved child to say the least. Relationships like this one are complex because there are so many layers that must be peeled back to find the true feelings in this family. Lord and Lady Capulet do not show signs of affection to Juliet, so Juliet has learned not to either. The way her parents treated her has determined the person that she is. Even though the relationships between parents and children are usually complicated, they are also simple because the key is simply love. If there is love and affection shown, then the child will know that their parent cares. If love is not shown then it will take a monumental event to make that love known and to show the feelings that have been held back. In ‘Romeo and Juliet’, that event is Juliet’s fake death. At this time Lady Capulet shows her true feelings, rather then the prim and proper act that we are so used to. When she says “Oh me, oh me! My child, my only life, Revive, look up, or I will die with thee (IV.v.19-20).” It is seen for the first time in the play that she truly does care for her daughter. Shakespeare is saying that parent/child relationships, especially in this case, are so simple that they are complex. If the Capulets had realized this sooner then they may still have their child, and this is the message that applies to all.

Bridget said...

The relationship between parents and children depends on the personalities and values of the individuals, but can generally be defined as the way a parent chooses to raise their child and how the child reacts to this set of rules. In Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" it is apparent that Juliet's relationship with her parents is strained and business-like. Lord and Lady Capulet have no interest in connecting with Juliet on a personal level, and barely even discipline her, leaving her in the care of the Nurse. The only time when they take charge is to choose a husband for Juliet. Since they barely know her personality, of course this man isn't the right fit, and because they handled the search for a husband in such a business-like manner Juliet rebels and desperately tries to reunite with Romeo. The strained relationship is clearly shown when Lady Capulet says "Talk not to me, for I'll not speak a word. Do as thou wilt, for I have done with thee(III.v.204-5)." Lady Capulet has no interest when Juliet tries to explain her feelings for Romeo, she feels that she is authority and therefore Juliet's desires have no affect on her. A healthy parent/child relationship allows for the parent to have control over the child, but both can express opinions and accept eachother's differences. Clearly Shakespeare is conveying the fact that a solid parent/child relationship, or any relationship for that matter is based on understanding one another and taking the other's feelings into consideration. The Capulets fail to follow this fundamental structure, and that is why their relationship with their daughter is so strained. If the parents and child truly understand eachother and can learn from their mistakes, then their relationship will prosper.

nora said...

Parent child relationships are based on the opinions and thoughts of two totally different sides. Parents think they always know what is best for their children, while children are always challenging their parents ideas. By the time a child reaches adolescence, they have their own ways of thinking and their own ideas of what's best for themselves. So this is why parents and teenagers never seem to get along. In "Romeo and Juliet", the characters Romeo and Juliet do not get along with their parents for different reasons. For example, Juliet's parents, Capulet and Lady Capulet, want her to marry Paris; because he is wealthy and well-respected. "Well, think of marriage now. Younger than you/Here in Verona, ladies of esteem/Are made already mothers. By my count,/I was your mother much upon these years/That you are now a maid. Thus then in brief:/The valiant Paris seeks you for his love(I.iii.71-76)." This quote shows how Lady Capulet and Juliet do not view things the same way. While Lady Capulet wants Juliet to marry someone she does not know, Juliet would rather stay single. Both have their reasoning on why either opinion is best.

Skye said...

Parent and child parent relationships often seem overly complicated, but in actuality are one of the simplest. The love you get from a parent is the only unconditional love you might ever get. One of the most tragic things about “Romeo and Juliet” is that Juliet’s home life is so emotionally unsatisfying that she seeks love in an unfortunate way. Lord and Lady Capulet believe firmly in the rule of “children must be seen and not heard.” They do not love each other and therefore do not love their daughter, whom they treat like property to be sold to the highest bidder. Lord Capulet in particular, says Paris cannot marry Juliet unless Juliet herself has consented. But he goes back on his word by forcing her into the marriage by threatening, “Hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch! I tell thee what. Get thee to church o’Thursday or never after look me in the face. Speak not, do not answer me (III.v.161-164).” Possibly what Shakespeare was trying to convey to the reader is that parents will never fully understand their children or their actions, and likewise a child will do the same. But you cannot make a parent or child understand what you want by ignoring what they want completely. There has to be a middle ground, a place where both parties can be happy.

Matt said...

The first relationship that a person will ever experience is that betweeen a parent and child. When children are brought into this world, they are immediately thrown into whatever relationship is available between the parents and child born. Inevitably, this relationship will greatly affect the identity which the child will assume. If a child is born into an abusive relationship, then they are far more likely to seek out violence than one brought up in a relationship with love and compassion. In the play "Romeo and Juliet" William Shakespeare displays this relationship with the characters of Juliet, Lady Capulet and Lord Capulet. She is so eager to love Romeo, most likely because of the lack of love coming from her child-parent relationship. Lady and Lord Capulet are negligent parents that are completely unaware of what is going on in Juliet's life. Capulet is not only unaware of her personal life, but he also imposes on her decision making. Capulet even says that he will not allow Juliet in the house if she does not marry the man that he wishes her to, Paris. "Hang thee, young baggage! Disobedient wretch! I tell thee what. Get thee to church o' Thursday, Or never after look me in the face. Speak not. Reply not. Do not answer me. (III.v.160-163)." If a parent of any time period forces their child into an ultimatum such as this, there will be certain conflicts within the household, and the child will be searching for escape routes from the situation. Shakespeare clearly shows how one's identity is greatly influenced by their parents and the child-parent relationship that they have. The play would be of a completely different makeup were the Capulets to show love to their daughter.

MM

Tom said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Tom said...

The relationship between a parent and child is a huge factor in the shaping of an individual. A solid and loving relationship will often lead similarities between the parent and child, while a stressed one could lead to a great deal of turmoil. In the case of Juliet and her mother Lady Capulet, lack of love led to a lot of distance between them. Had the two been closer, more trust would have been developed. In turn, Juliet becomes very independent in her ways, and steers clear of any guidance from her parents. The Nurse, is really a much better motherly figure to Juliet because there is a definite trust established between the two. Juliet often turns to her for guidance and even life-changing favors. Because there is such an absence of love between the parents and child in this case, Lord and Lady Capulet don't necessarily take Juliet's feelings into account. Capulet automatically agreed to wed Paris with his daughter without even consulting her. The worst part about it was that Juliet had no say what-so-ever in this process. "Wife we scarce though us blest that God had lent us but this only child, but now I see this one is one too much, and that we have a curse in having her. Out on her, hilding (III.v.165-9)." Capulet uttered these horrible words after Juliet refused to marry Paris. Shakespeare was trying to prove that this is a very delicate relationship that if not handled correctly, could go terribly wrong. If the love is not there, than neither will the relationship itself.

Jake said...

Parent and child relationships are the backbone of a family and a child's life. Juliet did not have a very strong relationship with her parents, Lord and Lady Capulet. There relationship had almost no love in it, it was almost nonexistent. Lady Capulet didn't even know how old her own daughter was, she had to refer to her nurse for the answer. Because of this loveless life Juliet tries to fill this void with a love of her own, Romeo. Not only has this relationship affected her love but because she is almost ignored by her parents, she has become a very independent child. This is independence is clearly shown throughout the play through Juliet's speeches and decisions. For example when her tells her she is to marry Paris she turns him down. Lord Capulet's thoughts on her daughter are then expressed when he says "Unworthy as she is, that we have wrought, so worthy a gentleman to be her bridegroom (III. v. 144-5.)?" This independent love life eventually leads to her own death. Her parents made no attempt to talk to their only child about how she felt or what she was doing. She was neglected and her parents finally realized this with her death. So, primarily Shakespeare is saying that a bad parent child relationship can tear apart a family, especially a child. A stronger relationship between Juliet and her parents could have saved her life. In conclusion parent child relationships mold the life of the child and the way the family interacts.

janelle said...

The relationship between a parent and child is the most important relationship one might ever establish. It is the first relationship a child makes, and one that, usually, stays with the child for most of his or her life. The relationship between a parent and child is one that influences a person how they will act, and even think. If there isn't a well established relationship, then the child will not learn what love is, or how to express it. Juliet, a strong female character, does not know what love is, because she does not have a loving relationship with either of her parents. Juliet, therefore, did not know how to handle the love of Romeo. The relationship Juliet had with her mother was distant, where both characters knew very little about each other. Though Shakespeare potrayed Lady Capulet to care only about who Juliet married, it is true that she did love her daughter, when she says, “Oh me, oh me! My child, my only life, Revive, look up, or I will die with thee (III.v.19-20).” Lady Capulet loved her daughter, but did not know how to express her affections. The insight that Shakespeare provides about parent and child relationships is that adolescents are accustomed to seeing only what they want to see, and look no further into what is displayed, but the truth is always there, just hidden safely away.

JP

Demetri said...

Parent/Child relationships are the outcome of a child's identity due to the behavior and environment the parents create for the child. In the play "Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare, the characters Lady and Lord Capulet, and Juliet show the idea of a parent/child relationship. What Shakespeare wants people to know through his play is that depending on the environment children grow up in, it doesn't necessarily allow the child to listen or obey to his/her parents. Juliet shows this between her mother and father by stating, "I pray you, tell my lord and father, madam, I will not marry yet; and when I do, I swear, it shall be Romeo, whom you know I hate, Rather then Paris. These are news indeed(III.v.127-127)!" Since Juliet was grown up under an environment of two fighting families, under her parents, she was forced to learn that all Montagues are bad. But by being the strongest character in the play, Juliet refuses the tasks created by her parents and indeed marries Romeo, the one her parents dislike. Sometimes in life, people who grow under the influence of their parents don't necessarily become that influence. In the end, it is important for parents to make the right choices for children as they get older in order for them to stay in a safe environment, making them a safe person.

lucy said...

Parent child relationships are the bond between a parent and child, and how it affects them; both parent and child.
Lord and Lady Capulet are an example of a bad parent child relationship in Romeo and Juliet. They've never shown Juliet love or caring and therefore haven't given her an example of what love should be, therefore causing trouble throughout the play. Juliet thinks she's in love with Romeo but doesn’t really know because she doesn't know what love is. Lord and Lady Capulet haven’t shown love to each other either. Getting married at a young age and having a child prevented their relationship from growing, and they are distant from each other. Now they are forcing Juliet to get married at a young age as well, and making her vulnerable to have the same relationship as them, a loveless one.
In Act III, you see this clearly because they are forcing Juliet to get married to someone she doesn't love. " Sir Paris, I will make a desperate tender Of my child's love: I think she will be ruled
In all respects by me; nay, more, I doubt it not (III.iv.12-4)." Capulet acts like he owns her and she is nothing more than a piece of property he wants to sell. All they want is for Juliet is to get married to Paris and have children. They only care about what they want, and not about Juliet, their child.